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What Causes Alcoholism?

August 13, 2021 , Agape Treatment Center

What Causes Alcoholism?

What Causes Alcoholism?

Alcoholism is an extremely complex condition. For years and years, it was believed that those who struggled with alcoholism simply lacked morals, were sinners or had a permanent mental health condition that required long-term hospitalization. As a result, alcoholism was harshly misunderstood up until recently. 

It wasn’t until Alcoholics Anonymous was first founded in the mid-1930s that people began to view the disorder as a Melody rather than a matter of choice or moral failing. Alcoholism is a condition that is still being studied in death, though it is now more understood than ever before. Addiction in any form is a chronic and relapsing brain disease. When neurological pathways are repeatedly exposed to chemical substances, they begin to adapt, and the way they interact with the central nervous system begins to change significantly. 

Alcohol Use Becomes Completely Compulsive And Uncontrollable

The brain sends out signals that essentially say, “We need to continue drinking or else we are going to die.” Suppose you have been struggling with an alcohol abuse disorder of any severity. In that case, it is important to understand that alcoholism can happen to anyone, and struggling with this particular disease does not make you a bad person in any way, shape, or form.

How Does Alcoholism Develop?

How does alcoholism develop? Why does this chronic condition take hold of some people in a short matter of months while others can safely drink in moderation for the duration of their lives? The answer is certainly not simple. To begin with, several risk factors increase the likelihood of a person developing an alcohol abuse disorder over time. Risk factors include:

  • The presence of an underlying mental illness.
  • Genetic predisposition — meaning an immediate or extended family member has struggled with an addictive disorder. For example, alcoholism is a hereditary condition (at least partially, and in most cases).
  • Consuming a significant amount of alcohol before the age of 18. 
  • You consume 15 drinks a week if you’re male and more than 12 drinks a week if you’re female. 
  • Environmental factors like growing up in an abusive household or working an extremely stressful and demanding job. 
  • Living in a family where excessive alcohol consumption is expected. 

Even someone who exhibits all of the above-listed risk factors can avoid slipping into a detrimental pattern of alcohol consumption. However, to do so, complete abstinence is always the best route to take. To learn more about how and why alcoholism develops, contact us today. 

Overcoming Alcohol Abuse and Addiction

As we previously mentioned, alcoholism is a chronic disease. This means that the associated symptoms can be effectively treated, but the disorder as a whole cannot be completely cured. However, millions of men and women just like you who have struggled with alcoholism in the past have sought professional treatment and have kept their symptoms in remission for years to come. The best treatment options for alcoholism have been studied in depth. It has been repeatedly proven that a combination of intensive behavioral therapy, 12-step program involvement, and a continuous commitment to Total abstinence is the best course of action.

Start Healing For Alcohol Misuse at AGAPE Treatment Center  

At Agape Treatment Center, we have developed an alcohol abuse recovery program that includes these components and more. We believe that a comprehensive approach to alcohol addiction treatment improves the chances of avoiding relapse and maintaining sobriety long-term. We also understand how difficult it can be to deal with an alcohol abuse disorder, seeing as this specific chemical substance is so widely used and socially accepted. 

If you would like to learn more about whether or not you or someone you love has been struggling with an alcohol abuse disorder or if you would like to learn more about our effective treatment program, simply contact us today over the phone or directly through our website.