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What’s the Lifespan of an Alcoholic?

September 3, 2021 , Agape Treatment Center

What’s the Lifespan of an Alcoholic?

Alcohol Abuse Disorder and Lifespan of an Alcoholic

Alcohol addiction is commonly referred to as “alcoholism,” and people who struggle with it are usually called “alcoholics”. Those who suffer from alcohol abuse disorder do not just drink too much or drink routinely; they have a compulsion to drink alcohol, they have to drink all the time, and they cannot control how much they drink. 

According to the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH):

85.6 percent of people ages 18 and older reported that they drank alcohol at some point in their lifetime, 69.5 percent reported that they drank in the past year, and 54.9 percent (59.1 percent of men in this age group and 51.0 percent of women in this age group) reported that they drank in the past month.

Drinking is accepted and considered “normal” in the U.S. From college parties to weddings; it is popular and a part of a lot of social activities. You also see it advertised on every billboard and commercial today. But just like everything else, you should only enjoy it in moderation. Drinking too much can lead to health problems, dependency, and alcohol addiction. Even those casual drinkers can turn into alcoholics.

Alcohol Dependence Can Significantly Shorten an Alcoholic’s Life

Many people know of the short-term consequences of drinking too much such as hangovers, drunk driving accidents, drunken injuries, alcohol blackouts, and alcohol poisoning. However, fewer people stop to think about the real cost of long-term alcohol abuse including the worrisome relationship between drinking and life expectancy.

Alcohol is the ingredient found in beer, wine, and spirits that causes people to get drunk if certain amounts are consumed. It is a toxin that in excess can cause serious damage to a person’s physical health, especially with prolonged abuse. The result may be a series of ailments, injuries, and illnesses that can significantly shorten an alcoholic’s life. In fact, alcohol is the third-leading cause of preventable death in the United States.

The Medical Conditions That Can Impact an Alcoholic’s Life Expectancy

The average lifespan of an alcoholic tends to be shorter than that of the general public because heavy drinking on a regular and long-term basis can increase the risk of developing several life-threatening diseases and conditions.

The potential problems and medical conditions that can impact an alcoholic’s life expectancy include:

  • fatal accidents
  • cardiovascular problems like strokes
  • liver disease
  • pancreatitis
  • cancer
  • suicide
  • compromised immune system
  • advanced aging

According to a study from the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health (NCBI),

A population-based register study including all patients admitted to hospitals diagnosed with alcohol use disorder from 1987 to 2006 in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden, People hospitalized with alcohol use disorder have an average life expectancy of 47–53 years (men) and 50–58 years (women) and die 24–28 years earlier than people in the general population.

Extend Your Life Free From Addiction at AGAPE Treatment Center

The alcoholic life expectancy can sound scary and morbid, but you can get help. Some of these problems and conditions are treatable or reversible, but the key is to stop drinking sooner rather than later and Agape Treatment Center can help.

At Agape Treatment Center located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, we understand that overcoming your addiction to alcohol is challenging, and not something anyone should do alone. Our medical alcohol detox helps you safely wean your body off alcohol while our other treatment programs help you learn to stay off alcohol for good. Contact us today to get started or get more information for a loved one.